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Tuesday 12 October

Dr Reyne Pullen & Genevieve Firmer

University of Sydney

Take it from the top, tackling Module 1 of the Stage 6 Chemistry curriculum (Module 1)

Historically, fostering an understanding and appreciation of matter can be a challenging task in chemistry. Whether due to the difficulty in visualising structure at the atomic level or the temptation to reduce this complex topic to simplified examples, the fact remains that many students struggle to grasp and integrate this knowledge into chemistry as a whole.

In this workshop, we will be providing some useful approaches and resources to address this challenge through the use of Predict-Observe-Explain structured activities and embedding this learning within a materials chemistry context. Through this lens, students are given opportunities to investigate materials of their own interest allowing tailoring of these activities to each students’ individual learning needs.

In addition to sharing these resources, we invite attendees to bring their own resources that have been successful for a group sharing and discussion on teaching Module 1.

Dr Reyne Pullen is currently employed as an Education-focused lecturer in the School of Chemistry, University of Sydney. Reyne has experience in delivering online and blended learning experiences, and designing course-level blended learning models, both at the tertiary level. Reyne has also worked within the secondary education sector, teaching both science and maths.

 

 

Genevieve worked as a senior science teacher (specialising in chemistry and biology) in a rural school in the Northern Territory. She is passionate about making learning fun and relevant to her students through meaningful hands-on activities, student-directed project-based learning and giving students opportunities to engage with genuine scientific inquiry. Genevieve loved her time as a teacher but wanted to understand more deeply how and why her students learn, so is now undertaking a Master of Philosophy in Science Education in the School of Chemistry at the University of Sydney. Her research centres around developing and evaluating active learning resources for year 11-12 chemistry, and how assessments can be designed to accurately evaluate student mastery of specific chemistry concepts and skills.

 

 

Julie Mulholland

ANSTO: Ideas for teaching radioisotopes in Module 1 Chemistry (Module 1)

Presented by the ANSTO Education team, this interactive workshop will present a range of ideas, resources and strategies for teaching the properties and uses of radioisotopes in module 1 of the NSW chemistry syllabus. Join us to discuss examples of hands-on activities, data processing questions, using models to explain phenomena, and alternative ways of explaining difficult concepts. We also encourage teachers to share their own experiences with their class during the session.

Julie Mulholland is an Education Officer from Australia’s Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). She is a highly experienced science educator, having over 30 years of experience teaching science, senior chemistry and senior physics in both TAFE and high schools, as well as 14 years as a Head Teacher Science. In 2013, she achieved a Minister’s award for excellence in teaching. Julie is instrumental in developing ANSTO’s data set resources for high school students.

Genevieve Firmer, University of Sydney

Using the Socratic Method to introduce students to the Mole Concept
(Module 2)

Do your students have trouble really grasping what the mole concept is? Do you notice that this has implications when they try to tackle titrations in year 12? This workshop presents a learning sequence that allows students to develop a deep understanding of the mole concept using the Socratic Method.

The Socratic Method is a constructivist pedagogy that involves dialogue between teachers and students that carefully builds on students’ pre-existing ideas and understanding. Using a variety of physical and thought models to scaffold the dialogue, students individually devise the mole concept and derive key mathematical relationships (m=m/Mm, C=n/V). Worksheets that carefully guide students through these activities and support them to revise each step will be provided. These free up the teacher to work individually or in small groups with students that need extra support, as well as allowing students to work at the pace that is best for them.

This learning sequence has been developed, trialled and refined over four cohorts of students with much success. It is particularly helpful for cohorts with less scientific and mathematical literacy, or classes where a large amount of differentiation is required. This workshop will discuss the sequence and key pedagogical strategies as well as provide teachers with the complete teaching sequence.

Genevieve worked as a senior science teacher (specialising in chemistry and biology) in a rural school in the Northern Territory. She is passionate about making learning fun and relevant to her students through meaningful hands-on activities, student-directed project-based learning and giving students opportunities to engage with genuine scientific inquiry. Genevieve loved her time as a teacher but wanted to understand more deeply how and why her students learn, so is now undertaking a Master of Philosophy in Science Education in the School of Chemistry at the University of Sydney. Her research centres around developing and evaluating active learning resources for year 11-12 chemistry, and how assessments can be designed to accurately evaluate student mastery of specific chemistry concepts and skills.

Cedric Le Bescont, PLC SYDNEY

Developing Self Efficacy in Module 3 Chemistry (Module 3)

In this workshop Cedric will be presenting ideas on how to engage all students in studying reactivity in Chemistry by developing self efficacy in Science with equipment readily available.   The meeting will occur on zoom where delegates can all share and annotate their screens. Cedric will be preparing slides for the presentation;  please feel free to prepare few a slides if you wish to share ideas of your own.

Cedric LE BESCONT, is currently teaching Chemistry, Physics and Data Science at Pymble Ladies’ College, I am relatively new in the Australian education system as I transferred from the French educational system only 5 years ago.

Cedric enjoys teaching the Australian Science Syllabuses and in particular Chemistry ..." as teachers, we are not expected to teach the content by simply transferring knowledge but rather to offer opportunities for students to develop their scientific skills by conducting investigation, constructing models, making predictions and solving problems. However, it can be challenging as most students view Science as a fixed corpus of true knowledge instead of a powerful method of learning and can be reluctant to work scientifically."

Assoc. Prof. Andrew McDonagh & Dr Brian Reedy
University of Technology Sydney

Perspectives on Entropy and Free Energy (Module 4)

This presentation will discuss perspectives on the concepts of entropy, enthalpy and free energy that will facilitate understanding of the drivers of chemical reactions.
We will address the questions “What is entropy?” and “Why do reactions occur?” from a fundamental level and develop an understanding of how these concepts affect student outcomes in Module 4: Drivers of Reactions. We will demonstrate how these concepts link with material in Module 5: Equilibrium. An interactive lecture format will used.

Andrew is a chemistry lecturer, researcher and Associate Head of School (Teaching and Learning) in the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Technology Sydney.
My teaching portfolio includes Bridging Courses in chemistry through to Honours and PhD supervision.

 

 

 

Julie Mulholland & Bridget Murphy

ANSTO - Addressing working scientifically skills using real-world science (Multidisciplinary)

Teaching at a working science facility like ANSTO, we focus on the process of science, not just the facts that go with it. Teachers will hear from one of our scientists talking about how they use working scientifically skills as part of their job at ANSTO. We’ll then discuss our data set resources, developed specifically to engage students with real ANSTO scientific investigations and data. These resources guide students in deconstructing the investigation, processing and analysing the data and formulating the same conclusions as the scientists – all working scientifically skills.

Julie Mulholland is an Education Officer from Australia’s Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). She is a highly experienced science educator, having over 30 years of experience teaching science, senior chemistry and senior physics in both TAFE and high schools, as well as 14 years as a Head Teacher Science. In 2013, she achieved a Minister’s award for excellence in teaching. Julie is instrumental in developing ANSTO’s data set resources for high school students.

 

 

Bridget Murphy has experience as a science researcher and science educator and is the Education Manager at the ANSTO Discovery Centre.

 

 


Wednesday 13 October

Trent Wallis, Sydney Grammar School

Linking Module 4 to Module 5: a Year 12 Depth Study on the kinetics and thermodynamics of equilibrium

In this session we will examine the Depth Study that we have run for the past few years. From the philosophy and thinking behind the Depth Study, we will examine links between the thermodynamic concepts encountered in Module 4 to the study of equilibrium in Module 5, in the process answering questions such as "why do some systems come to equilibrium whereas others proceed to completion?"

Trent Wallis is the Director of Science at Sydney Grammar School and the Director of the Australian Chemistry Olympiad program.

Dr Jenny Jones, UTS Consultant/Lecturer

Module 6: Acid/Base Reactions - broadening and deepening student understanding

Born, raised and educated in the UK, Jenny Jones obtained a BSc(Chem) from the University of Leicester and armed with this and a teaching qualification, taught the highly practical Nuffield Chemistry course for 9 years in grammar schools. Moving to Australia she worked for a further 12 years as Head of Science in two schools teaching senior chemistry and junior science and doing an MEd from the University of Sydney. Leaving school teaching Jenny gained a PhD (USyd) subsequently working as a lecturer in Science Method courses at both USyd and UTS. Her unshakable belief is that for science teaching/learning to be effective and engaging it must be student-centred, driven by practical work and with the students doing the thinking work. Nurtured during her early teaching years, these ideas have continued to develop through her own teaching and research and through working with experienced science teachers while organising and presenting many in-service workshops including ‘Captivating Chemistry!’ In 2004 she was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for services to chemistry education and the advancement of science education.

George Harb & Assoc. Prof. Andrew McDonagh
University of Technology Sydney

Making organic nomenclature accessible and a case study involving esters (Module 7)

Naming organic compounds using IUPAC nomenclature is often an obstacle for students studying Module 7. In this presentation, we will discuss strategies that will facilitate student learning as well as tools that would assist teachers. We will show some relevant examples using ester compounds.

George Harb is lecturer in the School of Education and International Studies at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). In his current role he is the subject coordinator of the 'secondary science' and 'Professional Experience & Classroom Management' subjects for our secondary education program. In addition to lecturing, He is research assistant, presently working on projects in Science Education and Teacher Performance Assessments (TPAs). Prior to UTS he was a secondary science teacher, with considerable experience in teaching senior Chemistry. In relation to Chemistry,  he also has strong industry experience, having worked as a Chemist for Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works (MMBW).

 

Assoc. Prof. Andrew McDonagh is a chemistry lecturer, researcher and Associate Head of School (Teaching and Learning) in the School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Technology Sydney.

My teaching portfolio includes Bridging Courses in chemistry through to Honours and PhD supervision.

 

 

Joshua Westerway & Stephen George- Williams
NSW DoE Science Curriculum Team | University of Sydney

Organic spectroscopy analysis - IR/NMR/MS (Module 8) 

Module 8 of the new Chemistry HSC course contains content which is unfamiliar to many teachers. The analysis of infrared (IR), mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can pose many difficulties in the classroom but there are some key steps to the simplification of this process. By examining a range of example data we will explore a streamlined technique to this type of analysis and provide strategies to aide the teaching of this complex concepts in the classroom.

Joshua Westerway is a Science Curriculum Officer with the NSW DoE and the Head Teacher of Science at Ulladulla High School. Dr Sham Nair is the Science Curriculum Advisor for the NSW DoE.

 

 

 

Stephen is an education-focused lecturer within the School of Chemistry at the University of Sydney. He also currently serves as the Director of First-Year Chemistry, making him the unit coordinator of 12 different units! He was originally a Physical Organic Chemist until he changed his focus to Chemistry Education, with a particular interest in laboratory learning and the use of VR/AR in teaching and learning.

 

 

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